Columns

Center, Dean
I have often been asked, “What’s the best exercise?” Read more >>
Manning, Jim
Spring is a sometimes season in Montana—sometimes we get it, sometimes we don’t. Such are the vagaries of a mountain climate, where the weather pays scant attention to the astronomical milestones of solstice or equinox. Read more >>
Jeff Hostetler
Spring in Bozeman is an amazing time for numerous reasons—the fields turn green, the bears awaken, and the temperatures warm—but for the fly fisher, it means the long-awaited thaw of snow and ice. Read more >>
Smith, Chrysti
The fringe-petaled carnation, generous of blossom, has for decades been a standard flower in corsages, boutonnieres, and table arrangements. The pink carnation was selected in 1907 as the official floral symbol for Mother’s Day. Read more >>
Center, Dean
For the last four years I’ve been teaching one day a week in Billings. Remarkably, there has been just one day when weather kept me from making the trip. Read more >>
Jim Manning
Montana—in a normal winter—is nothing if not cold. Snow drapes the mountains like a powdery blanket, the air is sharp and brittle, and even the stars huddle together for warmth. Just look at the Pleiades and you’ll see what I mean. Read more >>
Smith, Chrysti
Twice a year, on June 21st and December 22nd, we observe the summer and winter solstices. In June, when the sun is farthest north of the equator in our hemisphere, it rises at its northernmost point on the horizon and appears to halt in its progression. Read more >>
Center, Dean
We love to look at them, we love to know they’re out there doing their natural thing, but we hate to think about them bothering us. From big to small, here’s a potpourri of tips on how to deal with Montana’s critters.Grizzly Bears Read more >>
Smith, Chrysti
An impressive array of atmospheric events is played out every summer in Montana’s skies. While cloud-gazing in Big Sky country, consider the origins of the names of three common cloud types: cirrus, stratus, and cumulus. Read more >>
Jim Manning
When hiking the mountains and meadows of summertime Montana, it's always good to watch your step'lest you encounter the occasional bison or moose patty or one of the rodents, snakes, lizards, or other creepy-crawlies that inhabit the various terrains of the region. Read more >>
Jeff Hostetler
The art of fly-tying has evolved in a similar fashion to that of the painted canvas. Paints and mediums change as represented by the newest digital art endeavors. A similar evolution happened within fly-tying, and Rainy’s Grand Hopper is this summer’s pixel art. Read more >>
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