Review: Meditations on Hunting

hunting book, review, philosophy

Review: Meditations on Hunting

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Joshua Bergan

Though first published over 60 years ago, Jose Ortega y Gasset’s revered philosophical tome on the relationship between humans and hunting remains largely relevant in the age of smart phones and social media.

Among other ruminations, Meditations on Hunting (Wilderness Adventures Press, 2007) proposes that for hundreds of years, hunting has been chief among diversions from day-to-day work life, particularly among the aristocratic class which has the most free time. It ponders definitions of hunting and sport, and even posits some interesting ideas on the demise of the plains bison in the U.S.

Though not an easy read, his sometimes-complicated thoughts were expertly translated into well-argued and understandable English (even if some beget a little extra thinking). And while I can’t say I buy into 100 percent of Gasset’s assertions, he intelligently explains why he believes humans continue to choose to hunt.

All hunters, and many non-hunters, would be well-served to read this book.

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